See a members-only club in New York for female executives

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That’s why Childers and co-founder Lindsay Kaplan officially launched Chief, a club just for female executives, in 2019.


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Source: Initiated

At its core, Chief is a private network of “the world’s most powerful women” who use this members-only collective for guidance and growth, according to the company.

A meeting room with two tables, paintings, colored walls.


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Source: Chief

And the company’s message is clear.

A living room with large sofas, armchairs, paintings, decoration.  Some people work on their laptops.


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The first golden, all-caps message you see when you open Chief’s website is simple but powerful: “Women have always been powerful.”

Two women sitting in a large seating area surrounded by lights, plants.


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Chief’s goal is to “change the face of leadership” by empowering women in these positions and paving the way for others to join these prestigious roles, Kaplan said.

An empty conference room with a long table, chairs, exterior windows and a brick wall.


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And that mission has already attracted plenty of investors: The company hit a $1.1 billion valuation in March after its Series B funding round led by Alphabet’s venture capital firm CapitalG.

A living room with large sofas, chairs, paintings, decor, large windows.


Brittany Chang / Insider


Source: Chief

Chief currently has more than 15,000 vice presidents and senior executives and C-suite members…

An empty sitting area with two large mirrors, rugs.


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…as well as a waiting list of more than 60,000 additional candidates. The insider was unable to verify this number.

An empty sitting area with a rug, two chairs, plants, paint.


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The company expanded nationwide in January, removing more people from the waitlist.

An outdoor seating area with a view of the building across the street.


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But there’s no definitive timeline for how long someone might wait to officially become a member.

A napkin that says "chief"


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“The pace that will keep us growing at the right pace [and] still have a great experience for everyone is how quickly we try to get people off the waitlist,” Kaplan said.

A sitting area with a chair, lights, plants, paint.


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To join, in addition to the executive title, the candidate must have at least 15 years of experience in his career.

A lounge area with chair, painting, light


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According to Chief, its members work at more than 60% of Fortune 100 companies.

A lounge area with contemporary decor near a meeting room.


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But her network isn’t exclusively for women working in tech and finance.

A circular table with chairs in the center of a pink meeting room.


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Core members come from more than 8,500 companies and organizations like Doctors Without Borders and Harvard University…

Two leather chairs near the lights.


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…as well as companies like Google, Goldman Sachs, HBO, Walmart and Uber.

Rows of coffee cups on plates.


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And unlike the title “girlboss,” which is stereotypically reserved for white women, 35% of Chief’s members are non-white.

A meeting room with a long table, chairs, blackboards, television, lights.


Brittany Chang / Insider


Source: Insider

But to join these ranks, you will have to shell out some money.

A living room with large sofas, armchairs, paintings, decoration.  Some people work on their laptops.


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Annual membership starts at $5,800 for women at the VP level and $7,900 for women in the C-suite…

An empty bar with lights, plants, decor, glassware


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And this cost covers much more than just the title of “lead member”.

A meeting room with a long table, chairs, television, windows with a view of a neighboring building.


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Members have access to meetups, workshops, organized groups of 10 people who meet monthly with coaches…

A lounge area with sofa, armchairs, decorative arch.


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…and “conversations” with Amal Clooney, Barbara Corcoran and Stacey Abrams, according to Chief.

A table lamp near a meeting room.


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Depending on where a member lives or travels for business, they can also use Chief’s clubs in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and, this fall, San Francisco.

Cups, plates, sugar on a long table.


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Members don’t just join for access to the clubhouse, but physical locations certainly have their benefits…

A piano near a living room.


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…including the ability to mingle with peers during happy hour, coworking spaces and bookable meeting rooms.

An empty bar surrounded by bright orange chairs.


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Like any private members-only club in New York City, Chief’s multi-story New York location is adorned with exposed brickwork that contrasts with the contemporary decor and overflow of live plants.

Rows of plants on the ground and a wooden table.


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The ground floor houses a bar and a large room filled with seats, sofas and tables, which lends itself to becoming a large coworking space.

A living room with large sofas, chairs, paintings, decoration and a coffee station.


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… another bar in addition to the one on the ground floor …

an empty bar with plants, glassware


Brittany Chang / Insider



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