Don’t be fooled by these top flooring trends for 2022

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Wood is always in the lead

Hard flooring continues to grow in popularity, especially wood and wood-look alternatives such as laminate. These days these products are well designed and manufactured, and available in many shades and species, says Siobhan MacLeod of Flooring Xtra. More and more homeowners are choosing to lay wood or laminate throughout their homes to create a modern, seamless effect, she says.

Nordic-style oaks — think blond or beach beige oak — continue to be popular. Siobhan believes the soft tones, light-reflecting qualities and ability to complement many different design styles are the reasons for this. In contrast, she notes a growing move towards dark, cool-toned woods such as walnut, charred wood and black oak which add drama to a room and can provide an iconic 1970s look but with a contemporary twist.

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Parquet or patterned wood flooring and wide planks continue to grow in popularity, says Gratton McCallum of Forte, with herringbone and herringbone patterns creating a bespoke element for an interior.

A global call for more sustainable products, coupled with rapidly growing demand for raw materials, has driven suppliers to seek a more sustainable alternative to native and imported solid wood, Gratton says. Engineered flooring has therefore become a favorable option as it uses less than a third of slow growing hardwood than solid wood flooring and the more durable fast growing softwood. It’s also more durable and stable, making it less prone to warping and movement than solid wood, he says.

Over the past few years, the technology around lacquer products has evolved, Gratton says, and it’s now possible to apply around seven coats of coating to wood and still maintain an extremely durable matte finish. Low VOC water-based polyurethanes are used, which give the appearance of natural oil but with better water resistance.

Atelier Classic Plank in European Oak Rustic $306/m2 from Forte, forte.co.nz.

Provided

Atelier Classic Plank in European Oak Rustic $306/m2 from Forte, forte.co.nz.

Talking tiles

Stone-look tiles are still popular for a timeless feel, says interior designer Leah Frost of Frobisher. “We are seeing more soft pastel colored elements coming in to add a touch of personality while keeping the space calm and inviting. Playing with the way the tiles are laid can add a whole different aspect, whether vertical, horizontal, stacked, brick or herringbone.

Tilehaus’ Jess Brewer noticed a clear move away from all-white bathrooms and kitchens. Stone will continue to be a big trend this year, but with the purse strings tightening, we’re seeing people replacing stone with porcelain-looking alternatives and being drawn to organic finishes, colors and textures, explains Jess.

There is also a move towards maximalism and people are having fun with their interiors, using lots of bright colors, fun patterns and exciting combinations. Pink and green are currently popular accent colors, as are terrazzo-style floor tiles.

People are turning to larger format tiles for their floors, preferring 600 x 600mm sizes to reduce grout lines, says Jess, and homeowners are being adventurous with their grout colours.

Ultra Agata Atena tile $460/m2 from Tile Warehouse, tilewarehouse.co.nz.

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Ultra Agata Atena tile $460/m2 from Tile Warehouse, tilewarehouse.co.nz.

Left, Thirroul Matte Terracotta Look Subway Tile $130/m2 from Tilehaus, tilehaus.co.nz.  Right, Artisan Deco Tre tile $69.90/m2 from Tile Depot, tiledepot.co.nz.

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Left, Thirroul Matte Terracotta Look Subway Tile $130/m2 from Tilehaus, tilehaus.co.nz. Right, Artisan Deco Tre tile $69.90/m2 from Tile Depot, tiledepot.co.nz.

Sage wool

There’s been a comeback to wool rugs in the past couple of years and they have a special look and feel, says Siobhan MacLeod of Flooring Xtra. Big, curly stacks are popular, with an upsurge in demand for beige, taupe and brown. It seems Kiwis are really embracing natural-looking colors in their homes, she says, because not only are they forgiving when it comes to general upkeep, but they feel comforting and soothing.

According to Rochelle Flint of Bremworth: “We have found that most consumers are looking for rugs that offer a textured sensory experience and neutral tones, which gives the opportunity to introduce more vibrant colors into furniture and cushions. However, some consumers choose rugs in playful and bold colors to achieve an unexpected aesthetic.

Robust

With more and more Kiwis opting for wooden floors, rugs have become an interior staple. Simple styles with artisanal quality and texture, made from natural fibers such as wool or jute, and usually off-white, undyed or natural are in demand, says Siobhan MacLeod of Flooring Xtra.

Farahnaz Farahani of Rugs Direct also notes a trend for neutral colors such as black, beige and gray. For those who want a more traditional look, rugs with floral designs on the border and body of the rug with a medallion in the center are popular, as well as washed oriental style rugs for a vintage look. Rugs are used both as statement pieces and to define different areas of open-plan living spaces.

In terms of shapes, round rugs have been popular for a few years, says Zuzana Chovanova of Cronz, because they help offset straight lines in the room. “They tend to visually increase the size of the space, so they look great in smaller rooms. We also saw a strong demand for oval-shaped rugs this year as well.” Location impacts choice rugs, says Zuzana, with North Islanders preferring sleek textures while shaggy rugs are more popular with South Island customers.

Left, Bells Junction rug in barley by JKW Interior Architecture & Design POA of Cronz, cronz.co.nz.  Right, Almonte rug in clay $1799 from Weave, weavehome.co.nz.

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Left, Bells Junction rug in barley by JKW Interior Architecture & Design POA of Cronz, cronz.co.nz. Right, Almonte rug in clay $1799 from Weave, weavehome.co.nz.

In My Midnight Garden rug by Reuben Paterson POA from Dilana, dilana.co.nz.

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In My Midnight Garden rug by Reuben Paterson POA from Dilana, dilana.co.nz.

Concrete

A concrete floor colored in PFL 698 with Natural Polish by Peter Fell, peterfell.co.nz.

Simon Devitt/Supplied

A concrete floor colored in PFL 698 with Natural Polish by Peter Fell, peterfell.co.nz.

Turning your home’s floor tile into a bespoke finish is a smart option. Companies such as Peter Fell can advise on aspects such as type of aggregate, stone exposure, polish, filler and color. You can also color the concrete (Peter Fell has over 80 shades available) or you can leave it natural. Pictured is PFL color 698 in natural varnish by Peter Fell.

Vinyl

Vinyl Firenze Collection 3 in Lagos from Flooring Xtra,floorxtra.co.nz.

Provided

Vinyl Firenze Collection 3 in Lagos from Flooring Xtra,floorxtra.co.nz.

Sheet vinyl that replicates the look of encaustic tiles has proven popular this year as an easy and affordable way to bring pattern to spaces such as a bathroom or laundry room. Vinyl has a decorative look with geometric shapes and interesting colors, says Siobhan MacLeod of Flooring Xtra. Pictured is his Firenze Collection 3 in Lagos.


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